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Ahoy! I'm a Colorado-based, remote product designer. I analyze user's jobs to be done and turn that data into exceptionally pleasant software experiences.

Ahoy!

Small Screens

When your users are walking around with a pocketable, internet-connected computer every single day, it's increasingly difficult to make the case for web-only software. Mobile product experiences are an incredible opportunity for software companies to satisfy users any at time of any day.

& Big Screens Too

With all that real estate and the ubiquity of modern web browsers, desktop-sized displays are becoming more and more boundless, presenting an entirely separate set of challenges and even greater possibilities.

Rayka

It feels like an understatement to say that Rayka has been a helluva ride. In my time there as Head of Design, I wore even more hats than I realized would even fit on my head. I owned and executed user research & interview projects, feature validation, product strategy, UX/UI design, marketing and email design, and the list goes on. Working within an aggressively competitive space was an outstanding challenge for me as I shaped my understanding of product/market fit. Being forced to look at this space from every imaginable angle, I learned a metric shit-ton about keeping users engaged with utility, not gimmicks. Presently, Rayka has a 4.7-star rating from 158 users in the iOS App Store.

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Nift

Unfortunately, Nift went the way of many other startups—they pivoted countless times before eventually calling it a day on this project (read: abandon entirely). However, I'd be lying if I said this wasn’t a ton of fun to work on. Nift was born from the desire to travel often, and work in places that inspire you. To my profound dismay, these shining mockups won't ever move beyond codeless sketch files. Goodnight, sweet prince.

This is the first screen the user sees, complete with this adorable little astronaut that I arguably spent way too much time on that summer. (The client was stoked on it, so I don't feel too bad about it!)

More branding fun on the login screen, complete with the custom NYC skyline illustration. Facebook login is emphasized here, of course, for max breeziness during the onboarding process.

The figurative meat and potatoes of the product is here on this screen, where the user can browse nearby workspaces, and book on the spot. Meticulous iconography gives the user a clean, but thorough preview of what to expect with each listing.

The user has the ability to filter by price, distance, and amenities, such as a certifiably fast wifi connection, noise levels, and whether or not they serve alcohol, food, or coffee. And lastly, a simple sort switch for the mellowest search experiene possible.

Lastly, the user can pull up an individual workspace page, view its location on a map, read reviews, and slam the "book" button once they're happy with the details listed.

Homecook

This was a particularly fascinating idea that the client came to me with, wherein users can browse a mobile, P2P marketplace for selling homecooked meals. Though it's unclear if this sort of product would make it easier or harder for romantic partners to figure out what's for dinner, I was very interested in the idea of taking on a product design that would kick off a relatively unprecedented market. Unsurprisingly, however, the client ran into legal barriers and was unable to launch the product.

Fix Me Up Fam

Fix Me Up Fam is a concept for a roadside assistance app that I came up with during a particularly long stretch of dealing with a failing battery on my camper van. I had recently completed some exciting P2P marketplace projects, and it got me thinking: what if there were an "uber for roadside assistance"?

Turns out that I wasn't exactly the first to come up with this idea, but either way, I was pretty darn happy with these few screens that I came up with!

Nift

During the 12-week summer cohort of 2015, I had the opportunity to rebuild my entire understanding of UI and UX design while designing real products for real companies. The ultra high-speed environment was perfect for honing my ability to iterate quickly and efficiently, allowing co-founders to prototype, evolve, and uncover product/market fit. My favorite project that summer was Nift, a marketplace product that aimed to provide restaurants and coffee shops extra income by turning their off-hours dining areas into inviting coworking environments.

My experience at Coolhouse Labs was notably mind-blowing.

Here's my favorite project from the summer accelerator program!

Nift

Unfortunately, Nift went the way of many other startups—they pivoted countless times before eventually calling it a day on this project (read: abandon entirely). However, I'd be lying if I said this wasn’t a ton of fun to work on. Nift was born from the desire to travel often, and work in places that inspire you. To my profound dismay, these shining mockups won't ever move beyond codeless sketch files. Goodnight, sweet prince.

This is the first screen the user sees, complete with this adorable little astronaut that I arguably spent way too much time on that summer. (The client was stoked on it, so I don't feel too bad about it!)

More branding fun on the login screen, complete with the custom NYC skyline illustration. Facebook login is emphasized here, of course, for max breeziness during the onboarding process.

The figurative meat and potatoes of the product is here on this screen, where the user can browse nearby workspaces, and book on the spot. Meticulous iconography gives the user a clean, but thorough preview of what to expect with each listing.

The user has the ability to filter by price, distance, and amenities, such as a certifiably fast wifi connection, noise levels, and whether or not they serve alcohol, food, or coffee. And lastly, a simple sort switch for the mellowest search experiene possible.

Lastly, the user can pull up an individual workspace page, view its location on a map, read reviews, and slam the "book" button once they're happy with the details listed.

Resume Parse Tool

As a contractor at Gigster (2015-2018), many of the projects I worked on were early-stage MVPs, where the client comes to the table with an idea, leaving it up to me to turn their idea into detailed mockups. However, this project was more of a V2 redesign, where we were able to leverage lots of existing data and feedback from the users, as well as design & conduct a fresh set of interviews to drive the next version. And wouldn't you know it—the product received glowing reviews from existing users who previously dreaded using this tool.

This just in: User interviews definitely work!

In a face-off between conducting user research vs guess-and-check, I know which one I'd pick.

Resume Parse Tool

Russell Reynolds Associates came to Gigster with an existing tool for scanning their clients' resumes and converting the content into database-friendly data. An individual can quickly scan through the parsed data, ensure accuracy, and make sure everything matches up with any existing data. Since we had such a controlled userbase (employees of RR), we were able to easily select a few users with varying experience with the existing tool, and gain feedback on the new prototype over the course of a thorough user interview. From there, we presented a prototype of the new version, gained feedback on it, and implemented all of their feedback in an additional round of tweaks. and shipped off the design to RR to develop and implement in-house. I included a detailed style guideline, as well as some prototype-level code to ensure that there would be no guesswork when implementing front end transitions and animations.

The first step of the proecess involves importing a resume and checking to make sure there aren't already matching entries in the database. The user may choose to make adjustments to an existing record, or create a new one.

The next step shows what the user might see if they choose to make changes to an existing record. The user is trained to respond to the orange and red highlights. Orange indicates a need for cross-checking the associated information, and red indicates unusable information that must be adjusted before moving forward.

In user interviews, we discovered that there would be a significant advantage to having a "collapsed" view of each category, where they could quickly expand highlighted categories, and skip over categories that do not require the user's attention. The small blue rectangle represents the hover state of the red alert.

This view represents the edit state of a given resume item. In this case, the view shows the details regarding a previous imployment with Fleet Boston Financial Group. There are options for notating multiple employment locations, marking as a current or previous employment, duration of employment, etc.

And finally, a success message. From here, the user may submit anonymous feedback regarding the software, view the record they just created, or begin the process again with a new resume import.

Drew Koszulinski

UI & UX Design

Hey, there! I'm a product designer focused on research-driven user experiences sealed up in delightfully crisp interfaces. The way I see it, job-centered product direction & design is central to gaining rock-solid product/market fit. Smash the contact button below to get in touch!

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